The Sweet Spot of big business

Updated: Sep 16


So where is that . . . Sweet Spot?

Somewhere between big business economies of scale and localism? I know it exists, but how do we at a community and local government level find a way to determine the most efficient way to work together for the greater good?

There is much research that indicates polycentric systems of governance and resource management achieve greater levels of efficiency. By nature they are more resilient and have potential to far exceed centralised systems in terms of input of human energy and economics relative to gain. So why is it that systems which build collaboration between communities and local government aren’t more refined?

I’ve been prattling on about this for a while now. Sustainability in terms of the environment, climate change, renewable energy and our future as a species has taken centre stage. But what of the energy we put forth? How is this considered within our culture and our systems of governance?Over and over again I see individuals and groups coming up against barriers which impede progress and require such sustained and persistent levels of energy that many eventually give up. There is value in the time and energy we all put forward and there has got to be a better way.In the workplace a monetary value is placed on time and expectation in regard to productivity. When you step into the realm of community, charitable and heart driven work these structures seem to longer apply.

Imagine if local government created and supported systems which enabled community energy to be efficiently utilised and provided guidance around how to get shit done and clear pathways to success. People are an asset and I believe this must be recognised and built into our systems and structures to enable change for the better of all.

“Healthy citizens are the greatest asset any country can have.” I agree Winston Churchill. We have seen what government is capable of when the health and wellbeing of our citizens is at risk. Now how about taking it a step further to make all of this worthwhile. If such value is placed on human wellbeing should we not do justice by the potential of our population.

I would like to see progress which reduces friction in our systems, which dissipates human energy and allows all to fulfil potential as individuals and as communities. How about you?

Over and over again I see individuals and groups coming up against barriers which impede progress and require such sustained and persistent levels of energy that many eventually give

up.

This article by Vision Kerikeri Chair, Jo Lumkong, appeared in The Northland Age on 21 July 2020.

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